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Equal Voice Fellowship and Scholarship Stories 2014

Audio Report: Will Baltimore Public Housing Idea Work?

Audio Report: Will Baltimore Public Housing Idea Work?

The frustrations that have convulsed Baltimore this spring have roots in police practices, yes – but also much deeper roots, roots that stretch back over a century, in a history of various government policies that made racial segregation official. Audio Report: Baltimore Public Housing Your browser does not support the audio element. Take public housing, […]

Where Did Chicago Families From Cabrini-Green Go?

Where Did Chicago Families From Cabrini-Green Go?

CHICAGO — Annie Lloyd, 60, thinks living in Cabrini-Green ruined her life. She first stepped into Chicago’s Near North Side public housing project on July 7, 1977, with 4-, 3- and 2-year-old children. She thought she would be able to take advantage of the cheap rent and save money to take her kids to their own home. She left about 20 years later in the throes of drug addiction, her youngest son bragging about his gang affiliation.

The Search for Affordable Housing in Chicago

The Search for Affordable Housing in Chicago

CHICAGO — One wonders how it was even possible. Kids used to play ball in “Dead Man’s Field,” right in the middle of one of the poorest neighborhoods in Chicago, and look out at some of the most expensive real estate in the country. These kids could see extravagant condo buildings, but they were shut out of the world inside of them.

In Tennessee, Pregnant Women Flee Because of the Law

In Tennessee, Pregnant Women Flee Because of the Law

The godmother of NAS research is Dr. Loretta Finnegan, a scarlet-haired, Catholic-raised mother of five who looks like she walked off the stage of the Grand Ole Opry and into a Philadelphia neonatal ward. Finnegan coined the term “neonatal abstinence syndrome” in the 1970s; the Finnegan score for measuring symptoms of NAS, the medical name […]

A Tennessee Law Makes Motherhood a Crime

A Tennessee Law Makes Motherhood a Crime

At around midnight on Nov. 13, 2014, Tonya Martin slipped out into the yard that separated her trailer from the one in which her grandparents live on a lot in the eastern hills of Tennessee. Just two months earlier, the Monroe County Sheriff’s Department arrested Martin after she gave birth to a son. Her crime: […]

Families Come to Terms With Hunger in America

Families Come to Terms With Hunger in America

Tyra Lynn is rolling pie dough at her sister’s, Constance Lee, home in Mountain Home, Idaho. “We’re going to need more flour,” Lynn tells Lee. “I’ve got barely enough flour and I’ve only made one pie crust.” She’s visiting from Portland for Thanksgiving, and she’s taking charge of her sister’s kitchen. Audio Report: Learn About […]

Food Stamps Save Kids and Parents From Hunger

Food Stamps Save Kids and Parents From Hunger

Twelve years ago, life was hard for Tyra Lynn.  Her husband had just lost his job, and the then 27-year-old mother of three had a hard time making ends meet. She was struggling to feed her family and relying on food stamps. She wasn’t alone. In 2000, Oregon had the highest rate of hunger in the nation. […]

Hunger Defies Policy in Oregon

Hunger Defies Policy in Oregon

Mariann Duffy stands at her kitchen stove with an apron on, sautéing ground beef: “Everything I’m using today, I got from the food pantry.” Duffy’s family of three lives in a trailer in Jordan Valley, a remote, high desert community in Eastern Oregon. Her husband is disabled. So, the family gets by on disability assistance […]

Oregon Families Fight Hunger, Finding Help With SNAP

Oregon Families Fight Hunger, Finding Help With SNAP

There’s a good chance you know someone in Tiffany Warner’s position. Like one out of every five Oregonians, she receives SNAP benefits, commonly known as food stamps. Nearly 15 years ago, Oregon had the highest rate of hunger in the nation. The state changed a number of policies to try to help. But the percentage […]